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What are the penalties for armed robbery in California?

On Behalf of | Jul 15, 2022 | Criminal Defense, Theft Crimes |

An armed robbery charge isn’t something to take lightly. The impact of penalties could negatively change the rest of one’s life. But instead of accepting a charge at face value, putting up a fight can be the best course of action to avoid years behind bars and a negative stamp on your criminal record.

What’s the state’s definition of an armed robbery?

According to the state of California’s penal code, armed robbery is a felony-level crime with three main components. First, it involves swiping someone’s personal property or possession. This could be something as small as a cell phone or as large as a vehicle. The second aspect is that the item can either be on the person or nearby, so returning to the previous example, this could include a cell phone in someone’s hand or someone’s car parked near their person. Lastly, an armed robbery involves taking an item from someone without their permission and with acts of violence or threats against them.

What are the consequences of armed robbery?

Due to the felonious nature of an armed robbery, the main consequence is typically prison time. For first-degree charges, the range is usually three to nine years behind bars. A sentence can be on the longer end of that range when a conspiracy is an aspect or innocent people are present. And a second-degree charge can range from a two- to five-year sentence.

What possible defenses do I have?

Depending on the details of your case, it could be possible to reduce penalties. Consider the following penalties with your attorney when building a case:

  • False accusation
  • Self-defense
  • Mistake (e.g., didn’t know it belonged to someone else or no force was involved)
  • A set-up

Spending even a day in jail can be extremely traumatic. It’s essential to consult with an experienced attorney to learn what defense option may be suitable in your case. Because even if complete elimination of charges isn’t possible, reducing penalties could be life-changing. A second chance could be right around the corner.